M.Arch Thesis
 Final Review

 Friday, May 21, 2021



︎    Review Room
︎    After Party
︎   Presentation Schedule
︎︎︎     Pamphlet
︎︎︎     Optional Backdrop
︎    Critics, Advisers, Readers
︎      Students
            Xio Alvarez
            Ben Hoyle, Eytan Levi
            Lynced Torres
            Marisa Waddle, Lucas Igarzabal
            Erin Wong
            Ziyu Xu
            Andrew Younker

︎     Coordinators
            Deborah Garcia
            Andrew Scott
︎     Department Head
            Nicholas de Monchaux 
︎     MArch Program Director
            Brandon Clifford 
︎     Special Thanks To

            Eleni Aktypi
            Cynthis Stewart
            Kathaleen Brearley
            Christopher Jenkins

︎     Web Design
          Anna Vasileiou
  
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    



Marisa Concetta Waddle - Lucas Igarzabal

Concetividad Alegal
Remaking and Resilience
in the bay of Havana              



Advisor: Hans Tursack
Readers: Axel Kilian, Marie Law Adams



Photograph of section cut of site model– in the bay of Havana



This thesis investigates the rapid rate at which the changing of ownership, production, and policy has affected the Bay of Havana. In 2009, the Cuban government designated a single free port on the island just 40 kilometers west of the Bay. The Mariel marked an era of economic restructuring, a common occurrence in the past century. These policy changes aim to [ease the day to day lives of] of Cuban citizens but also leave them vulnerable to foreign industries who seek to mine the area for its unregulated resources, cheap labor, and proximity to US trade flows. The Bay, as a site of this intense geopolitical speculation and aging infrastructure, is emblematic of Cuba as a whole.




Photograph of overall site model – in the bay of Havana



The Bay, bracketed by an inoperable oil refinery and a degrading thermoelectric plant, is currently characterized by abandoned industry. While these forgotten sites restrict pedestrian access and foster pollution, they provide a critical connection to the shoreline, and therefore to the world at-large. The project is a speculation of a future that aims to return this site to its citizenry. It argues for the Cuban philosophy of resolver to leverage the resilient culture of Havana’s citizens against foreign opportunism. It explores the transformation of the site over the next five decades, as it adapts to the ever-changing economic, social, and political landscape of the country. The project salvages key components of the site, as opposed to depleting it of its resources. It develops new industries along the entire shore, adapted from abandoned factories, which circumvent material scarcity and access restrictions. The thesis operates between Havana’s historic ebb and flow of scarcity and surplus, defining a new vernacular of grassroots urbanism.




Close-up photograph of site model– in the Bay of Havana




Close-up photograph of site model– in the Bay of Havana




Close-up photograph of site model– in the bay of Havana




Close-up photograph of site model– in the bay of Havana




Close-up photograph of site model– in the bay of Havana







Map of Bay of Havana




Map of Bay of Cuba



Map of Bay of Havana



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